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Barack Obama Favored Over Clinton in Mississippi Primaries


Presidential candidate Barack Obama who has been campaigning early in Mississippi is looking to be favored over his competitor Hillary Clinton.

Presidential candidate Barack Obama who has been campaigning early in Mississippi is looking to be favored over his competitor Hillary Clinton.

"I don't know how somebody who is in second place is offering the vice presidency to somebody who is in first place," Illinois Senator Barack Obama told supporters in regards to The Clintons' recent statements about the two candidates joining together in the Presidential race. The crowd booed when he mentioned Hillary's idea.

"I'm not running for vice president. I am running for president of the United States of America," Obama added. "I am running to be commander in chief."

Clinton has been trying hard and aiming low and making hints that she'll be number 2 in the presidential race against Republican John McCain in November's Presidential Election.

"We have won twice as many states as Senator Clinton and have a higher popular vote, and I think we can maintain our delegate count," states Obama.

For the Wyoming Democratic caucuses Barack Obama won with 61% percent of the votes compared to Hillary Clinton's 38% percent which gave him 13 caucus wins to her 3 wins.

"I do not believe Senator Clinton is about change because in fact this kind of gamesmanship -- talking about me as vice president, but maybe he's not ready for commander in chief -- that's exactly the kind of double-speak, double-talk that Washington is very good at," he said.

Hillary Clinton who has made suggesting at making a joint ticket with the Presidential Candidate Obama hasn't even garnered a chance. By doing so, it would be easy for her get on top of the ticket.

At a Columbus diner, Reuters stated Obama said "The Clintons have spent all weekend talking about it, so I wanted to make sure there wasn't any ambiguity about it."

Clinton's earlier tactics in her campaign Monday brought together former military officers to question Obama's national security credentials to try to prove that he's "not ready".

If Clinton wins Mississippi it will bring her 40 delegates closer to Obama. Mississippi's 40 delegates include seven super-delegates (who can vote for the candidate of their choosing in the event neither seals the nomination) and 33 to be apportioned by the will of the people at Tuesday's polls.

Polls will open at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. and voters will have the ability to vote for either party's primary when they come to the polls.

The next big one to take place after Mississippi will be in Pennsylvania on April 22.

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