Header

Birth Control Pills May Cause Higher Risk for Cervical Cancer

According to the Oxford study, women who have consistently used birth control pills, which contain doses of estrogen and progesterone, for five or more years had twice the risk of cancer than women who have not used the pill.

Recent Oxford research has confirmed that long-term use of oral contraceptives doubles a woman's risk of developing cervical cancer and other cancers of the womb. Early research done in the UK even linked pill usage to higher risks of heart disease.

According to the Oxford study, women who have consistently used birth control pills, which contain doses of estrogen and progesterone, for five or more years had twice the risk of cancer than women who have not used the pill. That risk could decrease once a woman has stopped use of the pill; however, it could take up to ten years before the risk is reduced to that of a woman who has never ingested oral contraceptives.

The research began by analyzing data from more than 50,000 women from 26 countries. More than 16,000 of the women had been previously diagnosed with cervical cancer. The study showed that cervical cancer risks were up from 7.3 to 8.3 per 1,000 women in developing countries.

In the conclusion of the study, it is stated that birth control pills are still the most effective form of contraception, with an overall low risk of cancer development or heart disease, moreover, the pill can protect against ovary tumors.

Oral contraceptives have been known to have several side effects including changes in weight, lower levels of serotonin, which can cause depression, blood clotting, nausea, vomiting, headaches, hypertension, and hormonal changes. Consumers should be educated in the use and risk of any contraceptive before beginning a birth control regimen.

Subscribe to Memphis Rap Online

You may also like...

0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *